The Diary of Virginia R. Becker

The 1928 yearbook, is actually the diary of Virginia R. Becker, high school student, from 1930 through about 1932, based on the dates she’s added in. 

It contains mainly poetry, quotes from books, lists of author’s she likes, and thoughts on books she’s read or would like to own. Several newspaper clippings on literature are tucked in the pages – one lists events in Hartford, CT. That’s where my search for Virginia began.

Virginia Rosalie Becker was born in Connecticut in 1913 to Willis E. Becker and Lydia Chaplin. Her father was married before and Virginia had two older half-sisters, Marian Becker and Sylvia Becker. Her full sister was Kathleen Becker Faulkner. Virginia appeared to be the youngest of the crew. 

The Becker family lived in Wethersfield, Hartford, CT in 1920 through 1940. The Becker sisters married late, and Virginia may have had no children. It is from her mother’s 1949 obituary that we learn she married a Mr. English. But her full obituary in 1978 gives a broader picture of Virginia’s life. She clearly loved writing and books her whole life.

Most of this diary has quotes from books that Virginia has read or just authors she admires. There’s a little personal information, which basically illuminates her love of reading. Here’s an example:

August the Third ‘32

I finished reading Maughan’s “The Gentleman in the Parlor” last night – or rather a few minutes before dawn this A.M. I skipped a few pages and when I cam to where he said he was leaving Angkor “with a wrench,” I was tempted to give up, it was so carelessly written, as he as good as admits in the beginning. One can’t help being good-natured about it, however.

Another page simply reads:

Poets I Love

Shelly

Robert Frost

Edna Millay

Other entries appear to be her personal poems, one example:

I am two selves,

One quiet, mute, observing

With defeated tired eyes

Another self, a selfish

Raw and ailing soul

That can do nothing

But scar others

With hurts

Bruising itself the while

With almost unbearable pain.

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